Collaborative Physical Therapy — Karen Taylor Soiles, PT — 4001 9th Street North, Suite 230, Arlington, VA 22203 — 703.646.0313

Collaborative Physical Therapy

The human body is not symmetrical. The neurological, respiratory, circulatory, muscular and ocular systems differ on each side of the body with different responsibilities, functions, positions and demands. The asymmetry balances the body —
for example — the torso is balanced with a liver on the right and a heart on the left.

PRI trained therapists recognize these imbalances and typical patterns associated with system disuse or weakness that develops because of dominant overuse. This dominant overuse of one side of the body can develop from other system unilateral overuse. This asymmetry compliments the special functions of the two sides of the brain. Although the two hemispheres of the brain share responsibilities for some functions, each hemisphere controls the opposite side of the body. PRI trained therapists understand how the two hemispheres of the brain affect the balance of the body.

When these imbalances are not regulated by reciprocal function during walking, breathing or turning, a strong pattern emerges creating structural weaknesses, instabilities or musculo-skeletal pain syndromes. All PRI trained therapists incorporate reciprocal function to balance muscle activity around the sacrum (pelvis), the sternum (thorax) and the sphenoid (middle of the head). Different factors can all influence asymmetrical tendencies and patterns. Other animals have their own tendencies. Toads use their right forepaw more than their left, chimpanzees hold a branch up with the left hand and pick the fruit with their right hand, and humans usually balance their center of gravity over their right leg. PRI trained therapists recognize the common, integrated patterns of human stance like extremity use, respiratory function, vestibular imbalance, mandibular orientation and foot dynamics and correct these patterns through exercise programs.

BASIC CONCEPTS OF PRI

Karen Taylor Soiles, PT — Postural Restoration Center